Politics

UWSA Annual General Meeting Adjourned Early Following Contentious Discussion About Proposed By-Law and Policy Amendments and Former President’s Removal

The AGM, scheduled for Monday, April 25 from 5 to 8 p.m., abruptly ended at 7:28 p.m. after a majority of members voted in favor of a motion put forward to adjourn the meeting before all the topics on the agenda had been discussed. Of the 75 members present, 15 voted in favor of the motion, 8 voted against it, and 1 abstained from voting.   Students vocalized concerns regarding proposed By-Law and Policy amendments and asked questions about the former president’s removal. The By-Laws can be viewed here and the policies can be viewed here.  The motion to adjourn was put

By |Thu, May 5th, 2022, 4:07PM|News, Politics|

Opinion: What 17th-Century Philosopher Thomas Hobbes can Teach us About Masks, Vaccine Mandates, and the COVID-19 Pandemic

Thomas Hobbes was a 17th-century English political philosopher. Among other intellectual achievements, Hobbes developed the theory of the social contract in a way that no philosopher before him had. In so doing, he essentially launched the field of modern political thought and laid the building blocks of liberalism and liberal philosophy. His theory of the social contract remains as relevant as ever in this age of mask-wearing, vaccine mandates, and COVID-19.  Hobbes’ theory goes something like this: before we had government, humanity lived in a state of nature. In this anarchical state, everyone had to fend for themselves. There was

By |Thu, Feb 3rd, 2022, 9:18AM|Opinions, Politics|

Numb to the News: How We Become Desensitized in Wake of Tragic Events

The news of the shooting at Oxford High School, a suburb of Detroit, Mi. flashed across headlines last month. Ethan Crumble, a 15-year-old sophomore had taken a gun to school and fired several rounds before being taken into custody by police. By then, he had already killed 3 students and injured 7 others. A fourth student would later die from injuries in the hospital. This was one of 48 U.S. school shootings that happened in 2021 and by now the cycle plays out like a well-rehearsed choreography. There is a violent attack. The news echoes into our cars and living rooms

By |Tue, Jan 25th, 2022, 10:49AM|News, Opinions, Politics|

In Conversation with Noah Gascon: First-Year UWindsor Student and Founder of WindsorVax Finders

If you’re a resident of Windsor-Essex, you’ve probably run into WindsorVax Finders online, whether that be on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram. Perhaps this volunteer-run organization helping eligible locals find COVID-19 vaccine appointments has even helped you. But what you might not know is that WVF was founded by a first-year UWindsor student. I reached out to Noah Gascon, Concurrent Political Science student, Constituency Aid to Member of Parliament Irek Kusmierczyk, and creator of WindsorVax Finders to discuss how this organization came to be. Read our conversation below. RH: Can you tell me a little bit about yourself? NG: My name

By |Tue, Jan 18th, 2022, 10:38AM|News, Politics|

Senators Kim Pate and Marty Klyne Virtually Visit UWindsor’s Legal Process in Canada Class to Discuss Senate’s Role in Implementing TRC’s 94 Calls to Action

On Wednesday, December 1st, Senators Kim Pate of Ontario and Marty Klyne of Saskatchewan virtually visited UWindsor’s second-year Legal Process in Canada class, taught by Dr. Geoffrey Callaghan. They discussed the Senate’s role in implementing the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 calls to action and answered students’ questions on the topic in a Q&A that followed. Students were excited for this rare opportunity to speak directly with two members of Canada’s upper house of Parliament about a pressing issue in our country’s politics.  How is the Senate Advancing the TRC’s 94 Calls to Action? Senator Klyne, whose work focuses on

By |Thu, Dec 9th, 2021, 9:14AM|News, Politics|

Ford Government Won’t Challenge Ontario Court of Appeal Decision on Student Choice Initiative, UWSA Breathes “Sigh of Relief”

The Ford government has announced that it would not challenge the Ontario Court of Appeal's decision on its controversial Student Choice Initiative (SCI).  The SCI, introduced in 2019, allowed students to opt out of paying certain ancillary fees, notably those that funded various campus organizations. The decrease in funding that resulted from the opt-out forced organizations like student unions and radio stations to lay off staff and scale down services.  After a successful court challenge initiated by the Canadian Federation of Students and the York Federation of Students in Spring 2019, the Ontario Divisional Court struck down the SCI in

By |Tue, Nov 16th, 2021, 4:42PM|News, Politics|

How student voters are impacting Federal elections

It was an ordinary day for Grant Connolly, 23, a University of Windsor student on his way to cast an advanced ballot in the 2021 federal election. Accompanied by his family, Connolly said he was excited to cast his vote in Belle River, Ont. knowing he was completing his civic duty as a Canadian citizen. “I felt like I am exercising my right as a Canadian citizen,” said Connolly. “The fact that we live in a country that my vote can be heard ... every vote matters and every vote counts.” An issue which really pushed Connolly to the polls

By |Mon, Sep 27th, 2021, 8:40AM|News, Politics|

The Impact of Online Content on Children

By: Mitch Stewart It seems like every week there is some new cutting-edge tech that revolutionizes our lifestyle and productivity, never mind having to learn online in the time of COVID. It’s the golden age of computers and life has never been easier, right? But as technology continues to evolve, are we evolving with it? While there is no shortage of dystopias like Orwell’s “1984” and even 1984’s “The Terminator” which alert us to technological dangers of imagined futures, our present is, perhaps, the real thing. All killer robots and government conspiracies aside, the screen seems to know us more

By |Tue, Feb 23rd, 2021, 3:38PM|News, Politics, Technology|
Go to Top